French Goes Modern: How Interior Designer Carole Carter Malloy Designed Her Atlanta Apartment

The Malloys’ living room bones rely on a minimalist design approach and sophisticated architectural touches, but many key features were inspired by Europe. The hand-carved marble fireplace was created by a Spanish artist and the white oak herringbone floors come from France. Low-slung Italian furniture is from Context Gallery.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

“I get a lot of inspiration from commercial projects,” says interior designer Carole Carter Malloy. “I’m drawn to masculine textures like brick, steel, glass and wood.” So when she finished her apartment on the 15th floor of the St. Regis in 2018, she kept coming back to places like the Ponce City Market, the Barcelona Wine Bar and the shops of Sid and Ann Mashburn. After a year of research, she discovered that the same person, architect Mark Blair, had helped design them all. At the time, he was unavailable for residential projects, but he connected Carole with his architect wife, Sarah. (The two Georgia Tech grads now have their own residential and commercial business, Curious Projects.)

Carole Carter Malloy
Carole (pictured here) and her college-age children, Zoe and Scout, enjoy the St. Regis on a whole different level than most visitors. “Our kids grew up as teenagers in a hotel, which meant nervous wars in the grand ballroom with friends, elevator races and sleepovers here,” Carole explains. “Zoe took her guitar lessons in the lobby and Scout often did her homework on the fourth floor.” Carole herself spent her early years working at five-star California hotels like the Peninsula Beverly Hills and Shutters on the Beach, so she was thrilled to be on the corporate front desk.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Carole Carter Malloy
A covered porch off the kitchen provides outdoor entertaining opportunities.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Carole Carter Malloy
A metal fireplace frame made by craftsman Andrew Crawford adds an industrial touch to the office.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Adding another layer to this industrial look, Sarah took a French modernist approach. “We wanted the apartment to feel like an old Paris apartment that had been updated, with historic details like plaster walls, intricate woodwork and French oak herringbone floors,” she says. Touches like the Louis XIV-inspired moldings and subtly rounded corners where the walls and ceiling meet helped soften the 5,000+ square foot space. Marble permeates the house, especially in the kitchen, bathrooms and bar.

Carole Carter Malloy
A brick-lined fireplace and TV niche define one corner of the master bedroom. Peacock Alley bedding is topped with fringe by Dixon Rye. The bedside chests are from Stanton Home Furnishings and the bench from Anthropologie, with artwork by Carrie Penley (near the window) and Zoe Malloy (above the bed).

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Carole Carter Malloy
The master bathroom is located to take advantage of a great view, so Carole uses hidden electronic blinds – here and throughout the house – for added privacy when needed. The windows flood the room with natural light. Floor-to-ceiling marble gives it a timeless look.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Carole Carter Malloy
A Serena & Lily bed sits elegantly in an architectural niche in her daughter Zoe’s bedroom. Vintage mid-century lamps top a custom bedside dresser.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Compensating for all this elegance, the iron doors and windows add the sought-after industrial touch. Italian sofas, sculptural light fixtures and artwork by Carole’s daughter, Zoe, or friends and family such as Bruce Bobick, Maddie Grace Maierhofer, Lyall Penley, Jerry Chappell, Steve Penley, Carrie Penley, Tim McClain and Rob Matre complete the look. An antique gilt mirror in the living room opens accordion style to access a TV.

Carole Carter Malloy
“We actually play ping pong a lot as a family,” says Carole, who commissioned a custom game/dining table from Georgian artisans Venture Games. “We knew that, living in a condo, we would need something to do together.” Sliding doors, topped with abstract paintings by Carole and her son, Scout, reveal the bar or keep the look streamlined. The expansive fixture is by Lindsey Adelman.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Carole Carter Malloy
Modern lines highlight white oak and golden calacatta marble in the kitchen. Furniture craftsman Skylar Morgan fabricated the cabinets.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

A custom walnut dining table, which doubles as a ping pong table, was chosen for both style and family fun. Behind, pocket doors painted by Carole and her son Scout open to reveal the bar.

The Malloys enjoy the amenities of the St. Regis Hotel, including their beloved room service. “We have a good time together, because we’ve designed this with a public space and a private space in a way that kind of forces us to hang out,” says Carole.

RESOURCES | Architect Sarah Blair, AIA, Curious Projects, curious-projects.com Interior design Carole Malloy and Michael Berzsenyi, Josephine Design House, josephinedesignhouse.com Service provider The Berndsen Company, berndsen.com Entrance Metal doors: RG Ironworks, rgironworks.com. The living room Sofa and chairs: Context Gallery, contextgallery.com. Dining room Table/ping pong table: Venture Games, ventureshuffleboard.com. Benches by table: Jackson Builders, 770-712-1342. Lighting: Lindsey Adelman Studios, lindseyadelman.com. Food Cabinets: Skylar Morgan Furniture, skylarmorganfurniture.com. Owner’s bedroom Nightstands: Black Furniture, noirfurniturela.com. Bed: HR, rh.com. Bedding: Peacock Alley, peacockalley.com. Fringe Throw: Dixon Rye, dixonrye.com. Bench: Anthropology, anthropology.com. Rugs: Eliko rugs, elikorugs.com. Small drawing: Carrie Penley, carriepenleyart.com. Porch chairs: West Elm, westelm.com. Bathroom Lumen: Arterial, arteries.com. Foyer Door: Ironworks International Inc., ironworksintl.net. Girl’s room Bed: Serena & Lily, serenaandlily.com. Bench: Stanton Furniture, stantonhomefurnishings.com.

This article originally appeared in our Winter 2021 issue of HOUSE of Atlanta Magazine.

Betty K. Park